‘The micro-brewery industry is flourishing across Australia and we’re going to see a lot more of it but I put the caveat on that in terms of research. We are dependent on these high quality grains and hops that are suitable. Unless we have a strategy that supports agriculture to grow the crops and not have to import both the grain and the hops, then we don’t have an industry. I see it as a flourishing industry but it needs support at a bigger picture level than it’s getting at the moment.’

There are a number of microbreweries in the Inner West, what would be your message to them?

‘Keep going – it’s fabulous! Keep making more beer!’

Greens Leader & Craft Beer Industry Association No. 1 Beer Enthusiast, Christine Milne

‘The first practice we did without Jay was really difficult. We weren’t expecting that – just his non-presence there was tough.

‘Pat my brother was in town from Tasmania for the funeral. Pat will be filling in for Jay at this Saturday’s Smallworld Festival. We wanted to introduce Pat to the songs and that gave him two weeks to rehearse them and try to get them as close to the way that Jay used to play them.

‘It was the day after the funeral. We were all a bit exhausted. We’d all had the night out the night before at the pub that Jay used to drink at. We thought we’d jumped over this big hurdle in getting through the funeral and then all of a sudden, we had to go through a band practice without him being there.

‘This will be our first gig since his passing. If the gigs hadn’t been booked we probably wouldn’t have played for an extended period. It was Jay’s funeral we wanted to pay for.

‘We’ve also got a couple of gigs booked in Melbourne and my other brother will fill in on one of those plus another bass player who Jay taught how to play bass and he’s very close to us.

‘We’re not getting a replacement bass player. He’s not being replaced. People who are close to him are filling his shoes in remembrance. Once all these shows are done we’re going to take a long time off and who knows? For the time being I don’t even want to think about it.

‘On Saturday we are chucking in Acid Rain in the set because that was a song that Jay wrote. Just us being there and doing the gig is a tribute to Jay in itself. Same with the audience – he’s still fresh in everyone’s mind.

‘Every now and then you realise he’s not there. It comes in waves. Sometimes when you least expect it.’

Tumbleweed’s Lenny Curley about his brother Jay who passed away suddenly last month.

Tickets to Smallworld Festival are on sale at http://www.younghenrys.com/smallworld/.

Limited edition t-shirts to fundraise for Jay’s three year old son, Max, will be available for purchase on the day for $25.

‘I’ve been growing my beard for nearly 3 years. I always trim it because you do get a lot of split ends! I started Sydney Facial Hair Club over a year ago.

‘It’s awesome to have all these people that you’d never speak to unless you had some sort of facial hair. There are plenty of people in the group without facial hair – they like the idea of it but they can’t quite grow a good beard or moustache. We even have people try that probably shouldn’t! Quite wispy teenagey looking moustaches but we encourage it. We’ve got quite a few female followers as well that are just attracted to beards. I guess more from a social point it’s good to have a different group of people to be able to go out with or talk to – to separate yourself from your normal circle.

‘This Saturday (6th September) we are celebrating World Beard Day at Young Henry’s. We’re going to attempt to beat the record for the most bearded people in a human pyramid which stands at 15 people and we hope to get 21. I’m pretty small so I’m definitely going to be in the top somewhere.’

Free beer, live music and sunshine.

Sounds too good to be true but it’s not. Our friends at Young Henry’s are making dreams come true.

12.30 today (Sunday) at the bottom of Camperdown Park, three kegs of free beer (for over 18s) with Little Bastard playing on the back of the Young Henry’s truck.

Be there before the love runs out.

‘I love that it’s a sport for women that’s about contact. I didn’t know that was an important thing to me until I started playing. Full contact sports like this where women are physically supporting one another, standing in the way of someone else, protecting them. It’s really wonderful. I’m really proud to be a part of it.’

What does that do for women?

‘Women are strong and we can protect one another. We can protect and defend ourselves. Derby’s not about violence. It’s a game about strategy. When I see two blockers protecting their jammer, I actually do get a bit teary. I get a bit emotional about it. It means a lot. I don’t want to paint Derby as a violent sport because it’s not. It’s about strategy.’

If you could describe Roller Derby as a person, how would you describe them?

‘I’d say they’re feisty and never say die but they’ve got a really big heart. They care about their friends but they’re dedicated and focused and they work hard.’

Do you think that ties in with Jackie O?

‘Yeah, I think it does. She’s an incredibly strong woman. She has amazing style. Derby is all about having your own style!’

How would you describe the partnership with the Inner West League and Young Henrys?

‘It’s just a really great opportunity for us to hook up with a crowd that know how to get the Inner West people together which is what we really want people to do as well . We just want people to understand what Derby is as a game and how much fun it is and come and support their local team.’